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Download Kate Greenaway's Alphabet

Some time ago I bought my smallest book ever: Kate Greenaway’s Alphabet* 57 x 72 mm. I thought it was the sweetest little book I had ever seen. Not knowing about the fame of the designer Kate Greenaway (1846-1901) I put it in some dark drawer and looked at it from time to time.

Kate’s books were all outstanding successes in English publishing history, she was an icon of the Victorian era. Some of those books are still being reprinted today. This little gem I had accidentially acquired has become very rare and I have not found any reprints yet. More…

So I thought maybe I can manage to adapt her drawings for use on todays computers. I ventured to redraw her delicate illustrations blowing them up 300 percent, being forced to simplify them without loosing her touch. It took quite some time! While redrawing them I discovered that she most certainly drew them in at least three different sessions as well.

Then I scanned my drawings and put them in a font. To make the font more usable, I added the ten numerals in Kate’s style, the original does not have those. I hope she would have liked my adaptions.

Yours in a very preserving mood Gert Wiescher.

* Kate Greenaways Alphabet, edited by George Rutledge & Sons, London and New York, sometime in the late 1800’s.

Kate Greenaway's Alphabet Font Family Download

Download Kate Greenaway's Alphabet

Some time ago I bought my smallest book ever: Kate Greenaway’s Alphabet* 57 x 72 mm. I thought it was the sweetest little book I had ever seen. Not knowing about the fame of the designer Kate Greenaway (1846-1901) I put it in some dark drawer and looked at it from time to time.

Kate’s books were all outstanding successes in English publishing history, she was an icon of the Victorian era. Some of those books are still being reprinted today. This little gem I had accidentially acquired has become very rare and I have not found any reprints yet. More…

So I thought maybe I can manage to adapt her drawings for use on todays computers. I ventured to redraw her delicate illustrations blowing them up 300 percent, being forced to simplify them without loosing her touch. It took quite some time! While redrawing them I discovered that she most certainly drew them in at least three different sessions as well.

Then I scanned my drawings and put them in a font. To make the font more usable, I added the ten numerals in Kate’s style, the original does not have those. I hope she would have liked my adaptions.

Yours in a very preserving mood Gert Wiescher.

* Kate Greenaways Alphabet, edited by George Rutledge & Sons, London and New York, sometime in the late 1800’s.

Invaded 2600 Font Family Download

Download Invaded 2600

Invaded 2600 is based on the screen font of the 70’s arcade classic Space Invaders for the Atari 2600.

Each time you use Invaded 2600 you will be at war with enemies from space who are threatening the earth.

Good luck!

Titanium Font Family Download

Download Titanium

Titanium is a geek-ed out, über-technoid specimen of plasma-type.

Designed by Steve Matteson, this typeface is the perfect display font for your star cruiser or the weekend interplanetary lander. Like its namesake, Titanium is the strongest design for its weight capable of withstanding the jump to lightspeed without paradoxical distortions.

Titanium is now available for use on home world computing devices to capture the essence of galactic travels.

Leticea Bumstead Font Family Download

Download Leticea Bumstead

Relato Font Family Download

Download Relato

Relato has a low contrast and “a muscular” structure that makes it useful for setting longer text. In display sizes it has a variety of details that lends it a unique and personal expression. The formal principle of the serif, the variety of terminal strokes and the combination of curves and semi-straight lines gives the Relato a more “human” flavor.

The inspiration for the design comes from different traditional calligraphic styles. The upper case letter, for example, is based on roman capitals from the Rennaissance, whereas the lower case relates to humanist handwriting. Even so, Relato is a decidedly contemporary typeface, proposing individual ideas on the design of type. More…

The italic has a distinct typographic color thanks to the construction principle of broken lines. The bold weights have an increased contrast in the union of the strokes which helps improve legibility in small sizes and reinforce their personality in display sizes.

The family consists of a Regular version, Italic, Small caps, Semibold and Bold.

For a sans serif version of Relato, please see Relato Sans.

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